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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories The most viewed stories on NPR.org in the last 24 hours, updated hourly.

NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

President Trump discusses the planned travel ban extension Wednesday during a news conference at the 50th World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

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The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., sits at the center of what top Democrats and some ethics advisers see as a unique web of conflicts of interest. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, was among a group of Senate Republicans who insisted that the time each side has to make its case be extended. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A visualization of the SARS virus. It is a type of coronavirus and displays the coronavirus' signature crownlike appearance under a microscope. 3D4MEDICAL/3D4MEDICAL hide caption

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3D4MEDICAL/3D4MEDICAL

Garret Morgan (center) is training as an ironworker near Seattle and already has a job that pays him $50,000 a year. Sy Bean/The Hechinger Report hide caption

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Sy Bean/The Hechinger Report

High-Paying Trade Jobs Sit Empty, While High School Grads Line Up For University

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Kendra Espinoza, the lead plaintiff in the case, has two daughters attending Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. She is an office manager and staff accountant who works extra jobs to pay for her children's tuition. Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice hide caption

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Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice

Supreme Court Considers Religious Schools Case

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Then-Sen. James Jeffords, I-Vt.; then-Rep. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., drink glasses of milk in 1999. Senate rules during the impeachment trial of President Trump permit the consumption of milk on the chamber floor, a strange rule that has sparked a conversation on social media. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Alleged Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (far left) consults with his defense attorneys in the U.S. military courtroom in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, as a man who waterboarded him, retired Air Force psychologist James Mitchell, takes the stand. Janet Hamlin Illustration hide caption

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Janet Hamlin Illustration

Dwight Thompson (above right) spoke about The Kissing Case with his brother, James Hanover Thompson — and with his sister, Brenda Lee Graham (below). They spoke at StoryCorps in Wilmington, N.C. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Federal agents escort former Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration head Ángela Ávila-Marrero, who was arrested on Wednesday as part of a corruption investigation that resulted in an indictment against six defendants. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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A man holds a cold-stunned iguana outside an apartment complex in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Wednesday. "This isn't something we usually forecast, but don't be surprised if you see iguanas falling from the trees tonight as lows drop into the 30s and 40s," the National Weather Service said Tuesday. Saul Martinez/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Martinez/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospital staff wash the emergency entrance of Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where patients infected with a new virus are being treated, in Wuhan, China, on Wednesday. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP

Terry Jones performs the famous "Spam" sketch during 2014's Monty Python Live (Mostly) stage show. Jones died at the age of 77 after suffering from dementia. Dave J Hogan/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

A Very Naughty Boy: Remembering Monty Python's Terry Jones

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Lead House manager Adam Schiff speaks to the press at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday ahead of the second day of President Trump's impeachment trial. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

L-R: Rep. Adam Schiff, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Rep. Jerrold Nadler and Rep. Hakeem Jeffries head toward the Senate Chamber before the start of President Trump's impeachment trial Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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Drinking fountains are marked "Do Not Drink Until Further Notice" at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., in May 2016. After 18 months of insisting that water drawn from the Flint River was safe to drink, officials admitted it was not. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP